November 2, 2020

Sheena Desai, BS; Priya Manjaly, BA; Karen Lee, BS; Sara J. Li, BS; Cyriac Manjaly; Megan Noe, MD, MPH; Arash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this study, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of Groupon vouchers for medical imaging services in the US to evaluate the scope, pricing, customer feedback, and claims of these discount services. We found that many offerings made unsubstantiated medical claims and failed to mention the potential risks of imaging. Many customer reviews suggested upselling of additional scans at their visits and patient self-referral for scans. Our findings suggest a challenging consumerization of medicine that can put patient safety and benefit at odds with financial goals.

September 11, 2020

Sheena Desai, BS; Priya Manjaly, BA; Karen J. Lee, BS; Sara J. Li, BS; Cyriac Manjaly; Kathie P. Huang, MD; Arash Mostaghimi MD, MPA, MPH

In this study, we evaluate campaigns on GoFundMe.com to understand the outcomes and narratives of hair loss-related crowdfunding campaigns. Our findings demonstrate that has an immense medical and economic burden that patients seek to alleviate through crowdfunding. They also suggest suggesting that our healthcare financing systems may compel individuals to compromise privacy for support.

September 9, 2020

Andrew Creadore, BS; Priya Manjaly, BA; Sara J. Li, BS; Cara Joyce, PhD; Kathie P. Huang, MD; Arash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this paper, we surveyed over 2000 people regarding their preferences as to which areas of the scalp they would prefer, if obligated, to have complete hair loss. Our results demonstrated clear patterns of hair loss preference that remained largely consistent across gender and race. These location preferences are not reflected in currently used alopecia severity scoring tools, and could contribute to the established discordance between these tools and patient quality of life.

August 14, 2020

Sheena Desai, BS; Priya Manjaly BA; Karen Lee, BS; Sara J. Li, BS; Cyriac Manjaly; Arash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this paper, we queried ClinicalTrials.gov to evaluate the status of interventional trials for dermatologic conditions from April 2019 through March 2020, finding that there was a significant increase in dermatology-related clinical trial suspensions, withdrawals and terminations from March-May 2020 relative to March-May 2019. Our findings provide evidence to support that dermatology-related clinical trials were disrupted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which may have long-term repercussions on both patients and therapeutic development within dermatology.

April 20, 2020

Priyank Sharma MD; Elizabeth Tkachenko BS; Arash Mostaghimi MD MPA MPH

In this paper, we conducted a retrospective analysis of patients starting their first oral isotretinoin treatment for acne. We found that patients above 35 years old receiving isotretinoin for acne without baseline laboratory abnormalities rarely have high-risk hematologic, hepatic, or lipid abnormalities, confirming previous findings. 

March 11, 2020

Patient Perspectives on the Use of Artificial Intelligence for Skin Cancer Screening

Caroline A. Nelson, MDLourdes Maria Pérez-Chada, MD, MMScAndrew Creadore, BSSara Jiayang Li, BSKelly Lo, BSPriya ManjalyAshley Bahareh Pournamdari, BAElizabeth Tkachenko, BSJohn S. Barbieri, MD, MBAJustin M. Ko, MD, MBAAlka V. Menon, PhDRebecca Ivy Hartman, MD, MPHArash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this paper we used qualitative methods to evaluate patient’s attitudes towards artificial intelligence (AI) in dermatology. We found that overall, patients are receptive of the idea of using AI in skin cancer screenings as long as the human physician-patient relationship is preserved. Listen to Dr. Caroline Nelson, medical dermatologist at the Yale School of Medicine, discuss this topic in an interview with the JAMA Dermatology below:

Check out related editorial in JAMA Dermatology by Dr. Carrie L. Kovarik : Patient Perspectives on the Use of Artificial Intelligence


LGBT health and skin cancer risk

February 12, 2020

Association Between Sexual Orientation and Lifetime Prevalence of Skin Cancer in the United States

Sean Singer, BSElizabeth Tkachenko, BSRebecca I. Hartman, MD, MPHArash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this paper, we found that Gay and Bisexual men to have elevated risk of skin cancer relative to heterosexual men. Lesbians with lower risk of skin cancer than heterosexual females. Listen to Dr. Mostaghimi discuss this topic with Dr. Howa Yeung in an interview with JAMA Derm below:

Gender Identity and Lifetime Prevalence of Skin Cancer in the United States

Sean Singer, BSElizabeth Tkachenko, BSRebecca I. Hartman, MD, MPHArash Mostaghimi, MD, MPA, MPH

In this paper, we show a slight increase rate of skin cancer among non gender binary patients. Check out the related editorial from Dr. Howa Yeung in JAMA Dermatology: Sexual and Gender Minority Populations and Skin Cancer—New Data and Renewed Priorities.

Mostaghimi lab

Department of Dermatology

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Boston, MA, 02215